Tag Archives: MTA

The MTA of the Plateaux near the Middle Vézère Valley

The Middle Vézère valley in the Dordogne, south-western France, is a key area of world prehistory, well-known in palaeoanthropology for the high density of Paleolithic sites in caves and Rock shelters, amongst which are eponymous ones such as La Micoque, Le … Continue reading

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Handaxe from Oudry and the Rhône/Saône axis during the Paleolithic

The first picture shows a handaxe found at Oudry (Saône-et-Loire) during the 19th century ,most probably from the MTA. People living in the 21th century have enormous difficulties to imagine river landscapes not modified by men. In general, glacial rivers were perhaps … Continue reading

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Things you saw when crossing Doggerland: Boute Coupe handaxes

  This is a fine bout coupé handaxe, not from Britain, but from the Low Terasse of the Somme near Amiens. Together with another bout coupé handaxe from N-France, shown in my Blog, it indicates specific contacts between the Neanderthals … Continue reading

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On naming things: How does a backed Knife from the MTA look like?

This is a backed knife from an MTA context in Northern France (Fig. 1-3; 6x3x0,5 cm). The retouched margin is shown in Fig. 3. Interestingly this artifact was found in the Paris area by a collector, during the years 1905-1910 … Continue reading

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Small is beautiful: Cordiform Handaxe from Petit Spiennes

This is a small (8 cm long) heavily patinated cordiform Handaxe from the Petit Spiennes Area. It belongs almost certainly to the regional Moustérien de tradition Acheuléen. For the general public the Mons area (Belgium, Province of Hainaut, Wallonia Region) is famous … Continue reading

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The Ordinary and the Special: Triangular Handaxes / Bifaces

  Figure 1 shows a rare 12 cm long (sub) triangular handaxe from the Dordogne in S/W-France. There are almost no signs of use or resharpening on this artifact. Such bifaces do not belong to the  sphere of the common … Continue reading

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Quartz during the Paleolithic: More important than usually assumed

  This is a small discoidal handaxe from the Mousterian site at Kervouster (6x5x2 cm) made from Macrocrystalline Quartz (Fig. 1, Fig. 2&3 showing the translucent character of the piece).  The site has been described during an earlier post (http://www.aggsbach.de/2014/08/kervouster-a-large-mousterian-site-in-the-bretagne/) and … Continue reading

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Mont-les-Etrelles: Surface Mousterian ensembles in the Upper Saone region

These are several Mousterian artifacts from a larger surface collection from the  Mont-les-Etrelles, department of Haute Saône near Besancon. Haute-Saône is a French department of the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region named after the Saône River. The Haute-Saône lies on the crossroads between … Continue reading

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The Ordinary and the Special

This is an extremely flat elongated cordiform handaxe from Bihorel / N-France (11×7,5×0,8 cm). It was produced by the typical MTA method of shaping bifaces by the creation of a bi-convex transverse section by sophisticated façonnage techniques and the use … Continue reading

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Bout-coupé Handaxes and Neanderthals in N/W-France and Britain

Britain during MIS3 was well-stocked but treeless grassland, with short, cool summers and long, cold winters marked by blasting winds, frozen ground and persistent snow. This is what Neanderthals apparently faced as they headed northwest from their more southerly glacial … Continue reading

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